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Archive for May, 2009

sometimes it’s scary:

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sometimes it’s boring:

montgomery, alabama

montgomery, alabama

sometimes it’s fun:

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theme = driving

theme = driving

we made it!

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peanuts.

boiled peanuts

boiled peanuts

deep fried peanuts. with cajun spices.

deep fried peanuts. with cajun spices.

cinnamon pecans

cinnamon pecans

chasing after georgia peaches (i am the dot next to the tree)

chasing after georgia peaches (i am the dot next to the tree)

po boys

po boys

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i don’t know what’s happened to me, but ever since we crossed the border into georgia, i have been craving buttery and mayonaisse-y crab meat. all of my meals, except for one, have been based around crab. what has happened to me!?!?!? seafood is just so tempting, it makes a mockery of my vegetarianism; i just can’t say no.

aided by the caffeine gum that kelsy’s cousin provided us (i.e. provided me) with, we made it to savannah last night. starving, and jones-ing for a local brew, we ate at the local Moon River Brewing Company. The beer I had was good, as were the fried green tomatoes with blue crab salad. there are a lot of different recipes for blue crab salad, it seems, but the main ingredient is mayo, along with some spices and onions and stuff like that. the ambiance of the restaurant, however, i could only describe as bro-y, and so i will leave it at that.

this morning: sunday brunch (the first i haven’t worked in a while). and OF COURSE more crabmeat a lá eggs benedict (YUM) at firefly cafe. i think it was another blue crab salad-esque dish.

dinner: also crabmeat. went to the crab shack off of tybee island, and after a dinner of poached crabmeat — i think that this was another version of the blue crab salad but with more spices — and some other seafood, we got to feed the alligators. yes, that is a giant (fake) alligator behind us.

happy campers

happy campers

i think that you can tell just how satisfied i am.

happy memorial day!

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The other two girls rented bikes, and the three of us zipped around the historic part of savannah, ga, in the morning, ending up at the Colonial Cemetery by the afternoon. There are a lot of (semi)-famous people buried there, but I did not actually recognize any of them (oops).

The Daughters of the American Revolution were responsible for building this cemetery — just like Kelsy!

D.A.R. built this

D.A.R. built this

It’s an old cemetery, and unfortunately some of the gravestones are crumbling. But the ones left have a quality of the antebellum south that i’ve always associated with Savannah since I saw Gone with the Wind in 6th grade. The majority of the headstones have a picture of the weeping willows with the draping spanish moss:

antebellum headstone

antebellum headstone

just like in real life.

me, kristin, a weeping willow

me, kristin, a weeping willow

i really wanted to take an etching of this macabre/adorable skull and bones but it was too deep set, so i had to make do with a photograph:

antebellum punk

antebellum punk

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two nights in savanna, ga.

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after two days almost straight in the car we all have one armed famers’ tans, but are glad to have made it to moorseville, nc, where we’re staying with kelsy’s lovely family.

The car was sent off with gusto after being christened by my neighbor nate’s keepsake of a stick-on handle bar mustache:

nate and mustache

nate and mustache

and nick and kelsy teamed up to load my bike onto the back of my already crammed full jetta:

team work!

team work!

we grabbed some coffee and were ready to go:

road trip 09 woop

road trip 09 woop

the first day we drove down to dc to stay with a friend who lives in the eastern market area. last time i visited dc i stayed there too, and the eastern market itself is supposedly really historical (i’m not really sure the whole story behind it) but they have delicious fresh produce and a good little counter with food. we stopped for coffee this time at Peregrine Espresso, where they apparently make goofy coffee drinks with pop rocks and basil infusions and weirdo things that you wouldn’t assume went in coffee. i’m not even sure that people order them, but they’re on the menu all the same.

dinner was at an ethiopian restaurant in the adam’s morgan area of dc… it was nice to see a part of dc that wasn’t ann taylor-clad.

metro time in dc

metro time in dc

The next day we got up pretty early to make the long drive to NC. Although I’ve been doing all the driving up to this point (Kristin has never driven a stick and Kelsy claims that she’s not very competent — but we’ll see about that), i masochistically proposed that we take the scenic drive through the blue ridge parkway (in the Appalachians). Which, was beautiful and I would totally recommend it to anyone. Driving through all the windy roads was super tiring but worth it because the colors were just amazing. The yellows and greens were colors that I don’t think that even New England in the fall can replicate, and that we don’t get in the northwest.

taking in the sights

taking in the sights

(thanks for the photo kristin.)

It took us forever to figure out how to get there, because there is no specific address so we couldn’t use mapquest or the gps, and our atlas didn’t really even show it that clearly, so we figured that we are headed in the direction of waynesboro on the freeway but stopped off where I-64 becomes Us 250 at a gas station and the attendent with tobacco stained teeth just pointed towards the mountains and said that if we followed the road up the mountain, we couldn’t miss it. There was a sign: in one direction north via the skyline drive, and one direction south.

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Further and further south we go, however long it takes to get there.

We only drove the first leg, and got off with the plan to go the Natural Bridge, and more importantly to Dinosaur Kingdom (!). But, alas, to our utter sadness, the Dinosaur Kingdom (a science fiction reenactment of the civil war) was CLOSED. so we satisfied ourselves with picnicing our peanutbutter sandwiches at Foam Henge. (it’s really made out of foam):

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We gotta get on the road again, it’s getting late and kelsy and kristin are being very politely impatient to get going, hopefully to charlotte and to charleston and ultimately in savannah. but i’ll put up some pictures soon if i get the time[pictures duely incorporated].

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so i’d say it was about 7 hours until we are supposed to leave for our road trip. i, clearly, am not even close to being packed. well, i’d say that that was a slight exaggeration, but it’s not only that i have to contend with packing up my life, but i have to pack my life into the size of a recently purchased 98 jetta. like the trunk and half of the back seat. i’ve had less frusterating experiences (though waiting in line at the dmv for multiple days is NOT one of them).

but i have been telling myself more or less all afternoon that at this time tomorrow, i’ll have survived and all will be well and at peace… or at least i’ll have left that stress behind.

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Ok, so a friend of mine just told me about this website. funniest thing of my life. this is especially timely since i recently posted a picture of my family (but i seriously don’t think that it’s as bad as all these).

watch out for “the lean” and the mother’s day special.

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Last week I discovered the wonders of the movie Downtown 81, a semi-autobiographical film about the late Jean-Michel Basquiat, who’s just living the life in “post-punk” downtown New York. The tale made me nostalgic for the “good old days” of new york that i wasn’t even a part of — though through no fault of my own. (i –rationally — blame my parents for not being extremely young parents and birthing me at the precise right time in history for me to come to new york and chill with all those cool folks.)

here’s the trailer for the movie, which was produced and finished about 20 years after it was filmed. because the audio for Basquiat’s dialogue was lost, Saul Williams (yes, the awesome spoken word poet) did the voice overs of his voice. the shots of the Lower East Side are awesome. not to mention how awesome it is to see the Basquiat himself; he’s always been a sort of enigma for me.

but since i had seen this movie, he’d been on my mind a bit, remembering when i had first seen his work in person at the brooklyn museum, among other things…

so it was eerily timely that the other day, while walking downtown (to a very different downtown than that of the 80s, through the commercial soho of today), to see for myself the much anticipated new Topshop (which is so massive and overwhelming that it deserves its own post), and on the way down Broadway I stopped in Uniqlo, and saw Basquiat’s images all around me. Everywhere! I’m not sure if I ought to have been excited, but I have to be honest. I was a little horrified. Seriously? Basquiat? A champion of counter-culture, he’s always somehow represented an ability to go against the grain of the neatly rows of mass-produced and folded tee-shirts, all perfectly divided to small-medium-large. His work is now being mass-produced for Uniqlo?

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Don’t get me wrong. I’m not a dumpster-diving freegan with a plot of land to grow all my own vegetables. I have, in fact, bough clothing from this same establishment. But it bothers me, has me thinking about Basquiat, and then thinking about the walls of tee-shirts, made in who-knows-where and in who-knows-what kind of conditions. I can’t help but think that Basquiat wouldn’t have chosen to be a part of this. But is it really right to let it bother me so much? It is recognizing the work of a very talented artist. As the Uniqlo website says, in describing their UT project:

UNIQLO is continuing it’s ongoing contribution towards a credible youth culture with the return of the UT project; a collection of over 700 unique t-shirt designs by artists and designers from all genres and aesthetics.

Hold up. What is a “credible youth culture?” Does the fact that Uniqlo is producing this youth culture make it credible? Does the commercialization of the art lend credibility to the art itself? How does this make sense?

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I’m all for making art available for all people, even making it useable in every-day life. I have seen some very talented artists create clothing, and prints for tee-shirts, and Basquiat definitely does belongs among the everyday, not just in the “high art” arenas. But there is nothing “unique” about these tee-shirts, though I suppose in the spectrum of offensive tee-shirts (think any offensive spring break tee shirt, or pretty much any shirt that you can buy on st. mark’s place) it doesn’t even rank. it is a nice looking shirt, i’ll admit it. but i mean like, just think about it. you’re trying to impress a guy/girl, and he/she is like “nice shirt,” and you’re like “yeah, i bought it at uniqlo.” wouldn’t it be that much cooler to say, “yeah, i made it myself on this press that i keep this art space in bushwick that i rent with a couple of other young/hip/incredibly attractive artistic types. no big deal.” i’m just saying.

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